Light color blends

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Re: Light color blends

Postby Wolfy » Sat Apr 06, 2013 4:28 pm

It was the only orange-blue I could find. XD
Technically I could make them myself, but it would take a while, lol.
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Re: Light color blends

Postby Jon_jon13 » Sat Apr 06, 2013 4:52 pm

Try looking for "Isihara test" :P
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Re: Light color blends

Postby Sanzul » Sun Apr 07, 2013 1:32 am

Jon_jon13 wrote:Each cone gets excited by a certain wave length of the light, and only that length.

That's not entirely true. The eye isn't that sensitive (in fact, it's physically impossible for any sensor to be that precise according to quantum mechanics). Each type of cone is excited by a part of the spectrum. So the ones that see green don't see exactly one green color only, but see a general area of the spectrum. That's why the green part of the rainbow is kind of wide rather than infinitely narrow. The "areas" that each type of cone can see overlap slightly, which is why we can see the entire rainbow rather than just three narrow bands of color. Other than that, your description is accurate.

Wolfy wrote:I've heard of people being born without cones in their eyes at all. That's what I meant by "missing" really. Animals that are colorblind (like dogs) don't have cones.

Dogs aren't actually colorblind; they just don't see the same colors that humans can, which confuses some people. Dog can't tell the difference between some colors that most humans can easily distinguish, but can tell the difference between others. Trying to play fetch with the wrong color ball can lead to rather funny results, as the dog can't spot the (to a human very obvious) ball in the grass. Switching to a different color ball will fix the issue. From what I remember, dogs can't see red, but I could be wrong about that.

Similarly (or perhaps contrarily), some animals can see colors that we can't. For example, many insects can see ultraviolet colors that are unimaginable to us, which explains why some flowers have very odd or bland colors. To a human, their colors are nothing special, but to butterflies they'll really stand out... and the flowers didn't evolve to be seen by humans; they evolved to be attractive to butterflies. That's way off topic, though.
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Re: Light color blends

Postby YetiChow » Sun Apr 07, 2013 4:24 am

Sanzul wrote:
Jon_jon13 wrote:Each cone gets excited by a certain wave length of the light, and only that length.

That's not entirely true. The eye isn't that sensitive (in fact, it's physically impossible for any sensor to be that precise according to quantum mechanics). Each type of cone is excited by a part of the spectrum. So the ones that see green don't see exactly one green color only, but see a general area of the spectrum. That's why the green part of the rainbow is kind of wide rather than infinitely narrow. The "areas" that each type of cone can see overlap slightly, which is why we can see the entire rainbow rather than just three narrow bands of color. Other than that, your description is accurate.

Wolfy wrote:I've heard of people being born without cones in their eyes at all. That's what I meant by "missing" really. Animals that are colorblind (like dogs) don't have cones.

Dogs aren't actually colorblind; they just don't see the same colors that humans can, which confuses some people. Dog can't tell the difference between some colors that most humans can easily distinguish, but can tell the difference between others. Trying to play fetch with the wrong color ball can lead to rather funny results, as the dog can't spot the (to a human very obvious) ball in the grass. Switching to a different color ball will fix the issue. From what I remember, dogs can't see red, but I could be wrong about that.

Similarly (or perhaps contrarily), some animals can see colors that we can't. For example, many insects can see ultraviolet colors that are unimaginable to us, which explains why some flowers have very odd or bland colors. To a human, their colors are nothing special, but to butterflies they'll really stand out... and the flowers didn't evolve to be seen by humans; they evolved to be attractive to butterflies. That's way off topic, though.


This whole thread has gone pretty off-topic... :lol:

Some people with really "messed up" (according to medical science, at least - I subscribe to the theory that there's no suchthing as a "broken" or "malformed" person, just different people with different differences; which also means that to me there's no "normal" people either...) can actually see tinges from the UV/IR spectrums because their rods or cones are shorter or longer than "normal" and pick up the fringes of these wavelengths.

Cows have a very weak perception of red, not sure about dogs off the top of my head but I know that birds don't see yellow particularly well...
What's that you're eating? A nice, juicy apple? You weren't supposed to eat that you fool, you were supposed to make it into a pie! - last words recorded words of Francis D'Avre before he went looking for snowcherries, but found a hungry Yeti instead.
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Re: Light color blends

Postby Jon_jon13 » Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:45 am

Birds have their eyes based on 4 different colors. Four! It's even impossible to imagine how they would see the world, and how colors mix in their brain being based in 4 basic colors...
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Re: Light color blends

Postby tom k. » Sun Apr 07, 2013 9:06 am

As an interesting note, dogs see green as slightly more yellow than us, and they also see red as green. This means that whilst a red ball is great for us to see, in reality it looks just like grass to the dog. The reason or this is likely that apes evolved to pick berries, dogs didn't ^_^
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